Tag: hacking

Top Factors Driving Endpoint Security Strategy

Antivirus Software is dying. What will replace it?

In this industry perspective, Dan Larson of the firm CrowdStrike argues that antivirus software is becoming less effective at stopping damaging cyber attacks, but that companies need to look before they leap when replacing it. 

A sign on display at Office Depot stores informs customers that they can have Kaspersky Lab's software removed for free and replaced with competing software by McAfee.

Cold War Special: Office Depot Offers Free Kaspersky Removal over Spy Concerns

Pressure is mounting on Russian antivirus vendor Kaspersky Lab with office supplies giant Office Depot offering to remove it from customers’ computers for free and a Congressional hearing on the company’s links to Russian intelligence scheduled for later in October.

US Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein speaks at The Cambridge Cyber Summit. He raised questions about the use of strong encryption.

In Boston, Deputy AG Rosenstein picks up call for Encryption Back Doors

US Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein used a speech in Boston to criticize the technology industry’s use of strong encryption which he called “warrant proof,” even as he said law enforcement had no issue with its use. 

What can you tell about a company's security just by looking at it from the outside? A lot.

Hacker Eye on the Consultant Guy: Deloitte and the Art of spotting Vulnerable Firms from the Outside

In the latest Security Ledger podcast, we analyze the breach of Deloitte by talking to two people who spend a lot of time judging the security of firms by how they look to the outside world. Dan Tentler of the firm Phobos Group tells us what he found out about Deloitte doing some fast and dirty open source research. Also: we talk to Stephen Boyer of the firm BitSight about a new study that firm did of the gap between the security readiness of financial services firms and the third-party software supply chain they rely on. 

Security holes in mobile applications leave home automation hubs by Insteon and Wink vulnerable to attack, a researcher at Rapid7 warns.

Hole in Mobile Apps Leave Home Automation Systems Vulnerable to Hacking

Mobile applications used with two, popular home automation platforms by Wink and Insteon fail to protect user login information, leaving the devices vulnerable to hacking, a researcher at Rapid7 found.