contributed

Will hack for beer? Cisco's Talos security group rigged up a Kegerator with a WiFi hotspot and other controls, allowing an enterprising hacker who could break into the device to poor him or herself a beer. (Image courtesy of Marc Blackmer.)

At Industrial Control Security Con: Will hack IoT for Beer

In-brief: Cisco’s Marc Blackmer reports from the S4 Conference in Miami – one of the top gatherings of industrial control system security experts. Among the attractions this year: Justine Bone of the firm Medsec, the psychology of malicious insiders and a hackable “kegerator.”

Blockchain, which was developed as a way to provide assurance for Bitcoin transactions has applications on the Internet of Things. But first there are some technical hurdles to clear.

Analysis: Three Things May Limit Blockchain Use on the Internet of Things

In-brief: Blockchain technology will have to clear a number of hurdles before it will be ready to serve as a core infrastructure for the Internet of Things, the author explains.

Hacker Spaces (like the one pictured at University of Maryland) play a pivotal role in fostering innovation and community on the Internet of Things.

On The IOT: The Idea Is the Easy Part

I have a thing for makerspaces and hackerspaces, if you haven’t already noticed from my previous posts. To me, they are the epitome of what I love about the Internet of Things (IoT). It is something I call the democratization of innovation. The maker and hacker movements are global and are changing the landscape. They help to put technology and equipment, the opportunity to learn, develop ideas, prototype, and socialize and network in the reach of many who would not have otherwise had the opportunity just a few years ago. They are, to me, the nucleus of an evolution, if not revolution, of both innovation and society. I like to visit local hacker or makerspaces when I travel. At last year’s Internet of Things Solutions World Congress (IoTSWC) I learned about MADE Makerspace Barcelona, but just couldn’t make it there in person. A visit to MADE was locked into my […]

Anomaly detection is a critical component of incident response, but its no silver bullet, says Alan Hall of BlueCoat Systems.

Opinion: Anomaly Detection is no Silver Bullet for Incident Response

In-brief: detecting anomalous behavior is a necessary part of incident response – but it’s also harder than it sounds, argues Alan Hall of BlueCoat Systems in this commentary.

The Department of Homeland Security issued guidance for securing the Internet of Things.

Scaling Security for The Internet of Things with MUD

In-brief: Cisco’s Marc Blackmer discusses a proposal before the IETF that would create a Manufacturers Usage Description (MUD) standard by which device makers and their customers to specify the kinds of activities and communications are allowed for Internet of Things devices.