contributed

Heartbleed’s Heartburn: Why a 5 Year Old Vulnerability Continues to Bite

Heartbleed’s Heartburn: Why a 5 Year Old Vulnerability Continues to Bite

In-brief: more than three years after it was first discovered, the Heartbleed vulnerability in OpenSSL continues to plague organizations worldwide. Why has it been so hard to fix? In this Industry Perspective, Patrick Carey of the firm Black Duck talks about some of the complicating factors that make vulnerabilities like Heartbleed so hard to eradicate. 

Identity at Scale: how the Internet of Things will Revolutionize Online Identity

Identity at Scale: how the Internet of Things will Revolutionize Online Identity

In-brief: Far from ‘breaking’ the public key encryption (PKI) model, the Internet of Things is poised to turbocharge PKI adoption and revolutionize online identity, DigiCert* CTO Dan Timpson writes.

Tallinn, Estonia's Capital City

Estonia 10 Years Later: Lessons learned from the World’s First Internet War

In-brief: Gadi Evron recalls the denial of service attacks aimed at the government of Estonia in 2007 – one of the first recognized acts of ‘cyber war’ and a template for incidents that followed. Evron says there were many lessons in that incident – some of which the U.S. and its allies are still struggling to learn. 

Companies should make life harder for cyber criminals by ceasing the use of valuable, "static" data to authenticate consumers. (Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.)

Opinion: Disrupt Fraud by Devaluing Data

In-brief: companies that want to make life difficult for cyber criminals can start by moving valuable data off the front lines and finding ways to use less valuable information to verify the identity of their customers, writes Keir Breitenfeld, who works for Experian’s Fraud & Identity Solutions group.

Will hack for beer? Cisco's Talos security group rigged up a Kegerator with a WiFi hotspot and other controls, allowing an enterprising hacker who could break into the device to poor him or herself a beer. (Image courtesy of Marc Blackmer.)

At Industrial Control Security Con: Will hack IoT for Beer

In-brief: Cisco’s Marc Blackmer reports from the S4 Conference in Miami – one of the top gatherings of industrial control system security experts. Among the attractions this year: Justine Bone of the firm Medsec, the psychology of malicious insiders and a hackable “kegerator.”