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What did we learn from the indictment of 12 Russian hackers? We read the indictment so you don't have to.

Episode 104: Mueller’s Cyber Eye on the Russian Guys also Reaper Drone Docs Stolen

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 30:20 — 34.7MB)Subscribe: Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSS In this week’s episode of the podcast (#104): the Mueller indictment of 12 Russian GRU operatives for hacking the 2016 presidential election was a bombshell. It was also 30 pages long. We read it so you don’t have to and we’ll talk about the big take aways. Also: when researchers from Recorded Future saw an offer on a dark web marketplace for documentation describing the operation of the US Military’s classified Reaper Drone, they thought it must be a ruse. But they were wrong. We’ll talk with RF researcher Andrei Barysevich about how highly sensitive military drone documents fell into the hands of a low level cyber crook.

The website Bellingcat displayed recorded activities globally from the past 6 months. Left to right: Global, North Korea and South Korea, French Polynesia, Antarctica. (Image courtesy of Bellingcat.com)

Fitness apps: Good for your health, not so much for military security

Fitness apps are proving to be a lot less beneficial to military security than they are for military fitness. That after researchers in the Netherlands discovered that data from the Polar fitness app revealed the homes and habits of those exercising in clandestine locations around the world, including intelligence agencies, military bases, nuclear weapons storage sites and embassies.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is arguing that voice assistants should be allowed to be jailbroken, permitting security researchers to analyze their workings

Episode 103: On the Voice-Controlled Internet, How Will We Authenticate?

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 22:38 — 25.9MB)Subscribe: Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSVoice based interfaces are growing in popularity, complexity and influence. But securing these interfaces has, thus far, been an afterthought. If we are destined to interact with the smart systems around us using our voice, how exactly will we manage to authenticate to those devices? In this podcast we speak with Ben Rafferty of the firm Semafone about the challenges of securing voice-based systems. Semafone won the recent PAYMNTS.com Voice Challenge with a way to use Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant as an out of band authentication mechanism.