Other News

Sirens by the firm Federal Signal were hacked and set off in Dallas. But what role - if any - did computer tampering play in the incident?

Podcast: Hack, or Phreak – What Really Happened in Dallas?

In-brief: The April 7th hijacking of more than 100 civil defense sirens in Dallas was dismissed as an “old school” hack that relied copycat radio tones to set off a cacophony that lasted for nearly two hours. But was it? Security researcher Mark Loveless (aka “Simple Nomad”) has his doubts about the official explanation. In this latest Security Ledger podcast, he talks to Editor in Chief Paul Roberts about what might have really gone down in Dallas. 

Most U.S. adults had trouble identifying key cyber security concepts including what data was secure online and the definition of a botnet.

DHS warns of BrickerBot Threat to Internet of Things

In-brief: the Department of Homeland Security is warning about destructive attacks by BrickerBot, a new piece of malicious software that attacks Linux devices and renders them useless, wiping out critical configuration information and data from the devices. 

Serious data breaches depress the value of the affected firm's stock, an analysis by the firm CGI and Oxford Economics found. (Image courtesy of Library of Congress)

Survey Finds Breaches depress Share Price – a lot | Digital Guardian

In-brief: a report by the firm CGI and Oxford Economics suggests the impact of breaches on the price of a company’s stock may be bigger than many expected, depressing the price investors pay for the stock by almost two percent. 

A warning letter from the FDA to St. Jude Medical said the firm ignored warnings that its implantable medical devices and related software were vulnerable to hacking or unexpected failure.

Update: FDA says St. Jude Medical knew about Device Flaws 2 Years Before Muddy Waters Report

In-brief: In a damning report, the FDA said that St. Jude Medical* knew about serious security flaws in its implantable medical devices as early as 2014, but failed to address them with software updates or other mitigations, or by replacing those devices. (Editor’s note: updated to include a statement from Abbott and comment from Dr. Kevin Fu. – PFR April 14, 2017)

A researcher for the firm Equus Security warns that Samsung's Tizen mobile operating system is dangerously insecure. (Image courtesy of Samsung.)

Samsung’s Tizen Operating System: a Hacker’s Dream | Motherboard

In-brief: Motherboard reports on an audit of Samsung’s Tizen mobile and IoT operating system that suggests it contains numerous, serious security holes.