smart home

Child Smart Watches

Podcast: Why Germany wants Smart Watches destroyed and One Nation Under Trolls

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 48:59 — 89.7MB) | EmbedSubscribe: Google Podcasts | Email | RSSIn this week’s Security Ledger podcast, sponsored by our friends at CyberArk, we talk about the German government’s recent decision to declare kids smart watches “surveillance devices” and to order their destruction. Also: Adrian Shabaz of Freedom House comes in to talk to us about the latest Internet Freedom report, which finds that governments are increasingly manipulating online content to shape online discussions and even the outcome of elections at home and abroad. And finally: leaked credentials in a GitHub repository may have been behind Uber’s loss of information on some 50 million customers. In a preview of a Security Ledger spotlight podcast, we hear from Elizabeth Lawler of CyberArk about the proliferation of so-called “Dev Ops secrets” and how companies need to do a better managing the permissions assigned to applications. 

Samsung’s Tizen Operating System: a Hacker’s Dream | Motherboard

In-brief: Motherboard reports on an audit of Samsung’s Tizen mobile and IoT operating system that suggests it contains numerous, serious security holes. 

Online Trust Alliance to merge with Internet Society

In-brief: The Online Trust Alliance, which has focused on issues related to privacy and security on the Internet of Things, is merging with The Internet Society, home of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the groups said in an announcement Wednesday.

The Rich Aren’t Like Everyone Else: They Have More Cyber Insurance

In-brief: Insurance giant AIG announced Monday that it has started offering cyber insurance to protect individuals and families from ransomware attacks, data theft and cyber bullying. But don’t go looking to sign up at Wal-Mart: the service is only available to AIG’s high net worth customers. 

Researcher Says 9 in 10 Smart TVs Vulnerable to Broadcast-based Attacks

In-brief: a security researcher demonstrated a broadcast-based attacks on smart televisions, almost three years after a similar demonstration by researchers at Columbia. More than 90 percent of smart TVs may be vulnerable – but carrying out an attack may be challenging.