Tag: application development

Are You Creating A Culture of Security?

Are You Creating A Culture of Security?

Here at The Security Ledger, we’ve written often about the barriers to improving the security practices of software development organizations. It is simple enough to say things like “we have to teach people to write code that is secure. But to actually accomplish that across the myriad of companies that do software development is akin to boiling the ocean. Still, it is a far more manageable problem at the level of a single organization. In fact: it is quite do-able. How? That’s the subject of a Google Hangout Security Ledger is doing this afternoon in conjunction with Veracode. The topic: creating a culture of security within your organization.  In the hangout, I will be speaking with Veracode’s Chris Eng and Greg Nicastro about how Veracode, itself, built its secure development culture from the ground up. This is going to be a great discussion. Greg is the Executive Vice President of […]

An article for corporate general counsel provides guidance for developing security and privacy protections into IoT products.

Strategies for Securing Agile Development: An Online Conversation

There’s no question that agile development methods, which emphasize collaboration and shorter, iterative development cycles, are ascendant. Many factors contribute to agile’s growing popularity, from constrained budgets to increased user demands for features and accountability. Though traditionally associated with small and nimble software and services startups, agile methodology has been embraced by organizations across industry verticals – many (like John Deere) whose name doesn’t scream “app store” or “Silicon Valley Startup.” But if agile is here to stay, a nagging question is how to pivot to agile’s fast-paced and iterative release schedules without skimping on important areas like code security. After all, the conventional wisdom is that security slows things down: imposing time- and labor intensive code audits and testing on the otherwise results-driven development cycle. Fortunately, agile and secure development aren’t mutually exclusive. Tomorrow (Thursday), the Security Ledger and Veracode will collaborate on a Hangout and discussion of how to build, automate and deliver secure software using the agile […]

Vision Mobile's report says that the Internet of Things will fuel massive growth in the population of application developers.

The Internet Of Things Will Need Millions Of Developers By 2020 – ReadWrite

Matt Asay over at ReadWriteWeb has an interesting piece that’s worth reading on the (coming) shortage of qualified application developers engendered by The Internet of Things. Asay cites a new report out from the firm VisionMobile that projects a shocking 57% CAGR (compound annual growth rate) in developers between now and the end of the decade. Much of that will be driven by opportunities in the IoT. Like past gold rushes, the riches in the IoT gold rush won’t go to the “miners” (read: thing makers) but to their suppliers – the 21st century Levi Strauss’s of the world who figure out a way to “stitch” Internet enabled devices together, Asay writes. In other words: value in the age of the IoT is created not by generating data, but by making sense of the (low value) data spewed out by billions of connected devices. (This isn’t exactly ground breaking – […]

DUO found that PayPal's mobile API contained flaws that could make it easy to bypass two factor authentication on customer accounts.

Researchers Sidestep Paypal Two-Factor Authentication

Researchers at DUO Security claim to have found a way of bypassing a two factor authentication feature that secures logins to Paypal.com, eBay’s online payment service. The vulnerability could allow an attacker who has stolen a Paypal customer’s user name and password to gain access to the account, even though the customer had enabled the more secure two-factor authentication option. DUO described the problem in a blog post early Wednesday. According to researcher Zach Lanier, Paypal has published an API (application program interface) for its Security Key two-factor authentication technology that contains a vulnerability that would allow even a non-technical hacker to bypass the second factor when accessing a Paypal customer’s account. An attacker only needs a victim’s PayPal username and password in order to access a two-factor protected account and send money. “The protection offered by the two-factor Security Key mechanism can be bypassed and essentially nullified,” the company wrote in […]