radio frequency

airplane cockpit

Researchers Hack Aircraft Landing System with $600 Radios

Airplane radio navigation systems are vulnerable to manipulation using software defined radio, researchers have shown.

Revolar personal safety device

Episode 81: Hacking IoT with Physics, Poor Grades for Safety Wearables and Peak Ransomware

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 39:57 — 45.7MB)Subscribe: Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSIn this week’s podcast: researcher Kevin Fu of University of Michigan discusses his work on attacks that use physics to manipulate connected devices. Also: Mark Loveless of DUO discusses his research into how poor implementation of wireless protocols make personal security trackers a privacy risk. And have we seen peak ransomware? Adam Kujawa of the firm Malwarebytes joins us to talk about the findings of that company’s State of Malware Report. 

Iran Centrifuge

Researchers use radio to jump air gapped industrial control systems

Researchers at CyberX say they have found a way to sneak sensitive data off of industrial control system networks using radio frequency communications. The attack could be used to compromise so-called “air gapped” networks that are not connected to the Internet.

Hacking Warships, Capitol Hill takes a Swing at IoT Security and why CS Grads don’t get Security

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (22.3MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | TuneIn | RSS | https://www.securityledger.com/subscribeIn-brief: on this week’s Security Ledger Podcast, we delve deeper into the question of maritime cyber security, speaking with noted researcher Ruben Santamarta of the firm IOActive about the work he’s done exposing vulnerabilities in the software that runs both commercial and navy vessels. Also: Alan Brill of Kroll joins us to talk about The Internet of Things Cybersecurity Improvement Act. And we talk to Maria Loughlin of the firm Veracode about a new survey that suggests undergraduate computer science majors aren’t receiving adequate instruction in cyber security. 

Depiction of Federal Signal Siren

Podcast: Hack, or Phreak – What Really Happened in Dallas?

In-brief: The April 7th hijacking of more than 100 civil defense sirens in Dallas was dismissed as an “old school” hack that relied copycat radio tones to set off a cacophony that lasted for nearly two hours. But was it? Security researcher Mark Loveless (aka “Simple Nomad”) has his doubts about the official explanation. In this latest Security Ledger podcast, he talks to Editor in Chief Paul Roberts about what might have really gone down in Dallas.