wearable computing

Thing Ghetto? IT Pros Envision Separate Networks for Devices

Thing Ghetto? IT Pros Envision Separate Networks for Devices

In-brief: Could security, privacy and availability concerns created by Internet of Things devices end up encouraging separate “thing-only” networks? A survey of IT pros suggests that it could. 

IEEE says that wearable technology could repeat the mistakes of the past when it comes to security and privacy.

IEEE: Security Design Flaws Woven into Wearable Tech

In-brief: The design of wearable technology risks repeating the mistakes of the past, including poor security and privacy features that could pose a risk to consumers, according to a new report by IEEE, an information technology professional organization.  

Consumers should be wary of privacy and security issues affecting Internet-connected products according to the Online Trust Alliance.

Check it Twice: Consumers Warned of Privacy, Security Pitfalls in Connected Gifts

In-brief: More than 50 million connected devices will be purchased this holiday season, according to the Online Trust Alliance. But consumers should be wary of privacy and security issues affecting Internet-connected products, the group said.

Wearable cameras sold by the company Martel are reported to have shipped with a version of the Conficker malware. (Image courtesy of Martel Electronics.)

Firm Puzzled by Body Cams Infected with Malware

In-brief: a California company that makes wearable cameras that are used by law enforcement and the military said a report that it shipped cameras infected with the Conficker virus were “distressing,” but that it was unable to locate the malware on its devices or within its environment. 

Global cooperation and focus on basic hygiene may be a model for securing the Internet of Things, says the FCC's CIO David Bray. (Image courtesy of the UN.)

Is Public Health the Model for Securing the Internet of Things?

In-brief: are public health initiatives the best model for securing the Internet of Things? David Bray, the CIO for the Federal Communications Commission thinks they may be.