automobile

Episode 164: Who owns the Data Smart Cars collect? Also: making Passwords work.

In this episode of Security Ledger Podcast (#164): your car is spying on you. But who owns the data it collects? Also: LastPass’s Dan DeMichele joins us to talk about why password security is still so hard.

Connected Car

Hackers Remotely Steer Tesla Model S Using Autopilot System

Security researchers managed to take remote control of the Autopilot feature of Tesla Model S car using a wireless gaming keypad, highlighting the potential security issues with next-generation automobiles’ Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) that are meant to enhance driver safety.

Uber Self Driving Car at Accident Scene

Podcast Beta Deaths: are we driving too fast towards Autonomous Vehicles?

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 46:06 — 52.8MB)Subscribe: Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSIn this week’s Security Ledger Podcast (Episode #89) we talk with Beau Woods of The Atlantic Council and the advocacy group I Am The Cavalry about the death of 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg, who was struck and killed by an autonomous vehicle operated by Uber. Also: following Facebook’s privacy meltdown with Cambridge Analytica, we’re joined by Konstantinos Komaitis, the Director of Policy Development at the Internet Society about what real social media privacy reforms should look like. And a new Ponemon Institute survey finds companies are convinced that insecure Internet of Things devices will result in them being hacked – but they’re not doing anything to stop it.

Uber Autonomous Vehicle

Autonomous vehicles could save more lives than they take. That might not matter.

Autonomous driving technology has the potential to save many more lives than it takes. But that may not matter if the public becomes convinced that autonomous vehicles are a danger to society. 

Updated: A New Lobbying Group is fighting Right to Repair Laws

Consumer advocates and proponents of right to repair laws in 17 states have a new enemy to worry about. The Security Innovation Center, with backing of powerful tech industry groups, is arguing that letting consumers fix their own devices will empower hackers.*