Hacks & Hackers

Colleges, universities and K-12 schools collect lots of personal data on students. But how well do they protect it?  (Image: Yale University. Photo courtesy of Library of Congress.)

OSINT University: are Colleges and Universities protecting Student Data?

In-brief: Colleges and universities collect reams of student data – including personally identifying information- as part of their student “directory” files. They then distribute it to – basically – whomever asks. In this podcast, we talk with researcher Leah Figueroa who has researched the issue. Also: where are all those Devil’s Ivy attacks? And: companies are desperate for tools and talent to beat back sophisticated threats. Is artificial intelligence the answer? We talk with Endgame about the results of a new survey. 

Fancy Bear? More like Senator Bedfellow, says Bev Harris of Black Box Voting

It’s the Corruption, Stupid: why Russians aren’t the biggest threat to Election Security

In-brief: Russian hackers aren’t the biggest threat to the security and integrity of elections says Bev Harris of Black Box Voting. Instead, it’s a more common enemy: run of the mill political corruption, mostly at the local level. Also: Eric Hodge of CyberScout talks about the challenges of helping states secure their election systems. Problem number one: recalcitrant voting machine makers. 

Miller and Valasek used a wireless hack to take control of a Jeep Cherokee, installing an image of themselves on the dashboard monitor.

Jeep Hackers Miller and Valasek Reunite at Autonomous Driving Start-up Cruise

In-brief: Security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek are re-uniting at autonomous driving start-up Cruise after both, independently leaving ride hailing firm Uber in recent months. 

A network of testing facilities will assess the security of medical devices.

Update: WHISTL Labs will be Cyber Range for Medical Devices

In-brief:  A global federation of labs will test the security of medical devices, according to an announcement on Monday by a consortium of healthcare industry firms, universities and technology firms. (Updated with comments from Dr. Nordenberg. PFR 7/25/2017)

FedEx said the Petya malware outbreak in its TNT subsidiary in June will have a material impact on the firm's financial performance. (Image courtesy of FedEx.)

Petya-Bitten Subsidiary will materially impact FedEx

In-brief: FedEx said its TNT subsidiary was still relying on manual processes more than a week after it was ravaged by the Petya wiper malware. The attack will materially impact the company’s financial performance in 2018, FedEx said in a filing with the SEC.