Post Tagged with: "Java"

Cisco Survey: 100% of Fortune 500 Hosting Malware?

January 16, 2014 08:00Comments Off
Cisco Survey: 100% of Fortune 500 Hosting Malware?

If you’re working in IT at a Fortune 500 firm, Cisco Systems has some unwelcome news: you have a malware problem. According to the 2013 Annual Security Report from the networking giant, 100 percent of 30 Fortune 500 firms it surveyed sent traffic to Web sites that host malware. Ninety-six percent of those networks communicated with hijacked servers operated by cyber criminals or other malicious actors and 92 percent transmitted traffic to Web pages without content, which typically host malicious activity. “It was surprising that it was 100 percent, but we know that it’s not if you’re going to be compromised, but when,” said Levi Gundert, a technical lead in Cisco’s Threat Research, Analysis and Communications (TRAC) group in an interview with The Security Ledger. Among the high points (or low points) in Cisco’s Report: Cisco observed the highest number of vulnerabilities and threats on its Intellishield alert service in the 13 years […]

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Security Of “Things” Increasingly The Stuff Of Headlines

August 12, 2013 11:201 comment
Security Of “Things” Increasingly The Stuff Of Headlines

It looks as if the mainstream media is waking to the security implications of the “Internet of Things,” in the wake of recent demonstrations at the Black Hat and DEFCON conferences that highlight vulnerabilities in everything from home automation systems to automobiles to toilets. Stories in The New York Times and other major news outlets in the last week have highlighted concerns about “the cyber crime of things” as Christopher Mims, writing in The Atlantic, called it. Insecure, Internet connected devices ranging from surveillance cameras to home heating and cooling systems could leave consumers vulnerable to remote attacks and spying. The stories come after hacks to non-traditional computing platforms stole most of the headlines from this year’s Black Hat and DEFCON shows in Las Vegas. A compromise of a Toyota Prius hybrid by researchers Charlie Miller of Twitter and Chris Valasek of IOActive was featured prominently in stories by Forbes and […]

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Samsung Smart TV: Like A Web App Riddled With Vulnerabilities

August 1, 2013 21:59Comments Off
Samsung Smart TV: Like A Web App Riddled With Vulnerabilities

Smart television sets aren’t short on cool features. Users can connect to Facebook and Twitter from the same screen that they’re using to watch Real Housewives of New Jersey, or log into Skype and use a built in- or external webcam to have a video chat. Unfortunately, the more TVs start to look like computers, the more they are becoming subject to the same underlying code vulnerabilities that have caused headaches and heartache in the PC space. That was the message of two researchers at the Black Hat Briefings security conference Thursday, who warned that one such product, Samsung’s SmartTV, was rife with vulnerabilities that could leave the devices vulnerable to remote attacks. Vulnerabilities in the underlying operating system and applications on Samsung SmartTVs could be used to steal sensitive information on the device owner, or even spy on the television’s surroundings using an integrated webcam, said Aaron Grattafiori and Josh […]

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The History Of Programming Languages – And Their Popularity

April 17, 2013 12:27Comments Off
The History Of Programming Languages – And Their Popularity

Our friends over at Veracode posted a great little infograph this week that explains the history of computer programming languages, starting with software development’s forefather foremother, the lovely Ada Lovelace, who is credited with developing the first programming language, an algorithm for a mechanical computer dubbed the Analytic Engine in 1883! The graphic describes the history of modern programming languages, including COBOL, FORTRAN and LISP in the 1950s and 60s, up to today’s dominant languages: Java, C and Objective-C. Check it out! Infographic by Veracode Application Security

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D.C. Insider Site NationalJournal.com Serving Malware

March 13, 2013 08:23Comments Off
D.C. Insider Site NationalJournal.com Serving Malware

Watering hole -style attacks are all the rage these days, as our recent coverage on the attacks against Facebook and Twitter suggest. That makes us look askance at any report of a web site compromise – especially at a site that’s known to serve an audience that’s of interest to sophisticated, nation-state backed hacking crews.   That’s why it caught our attention this week that the web site for the DC-insider magazine The National Journal (nationaljournal.com) was found serving malware. According to a blog post by Anup Ghosh at the security firm Invincea, The National Journal’s Web site was serving up attacks to visitors of the site on Tuesday. The discovery was surprising, as the magazine acknowledged an earlier compromise on February 28th and said that it had since secured its site. That National Journal, part of The Atlantic Media Company, is widely read within Washington D.C.’s political circles. It […]

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EverNote Latest Site Hacked In Coordinated Attack

March 2, 2013 21:30Comments Off
EverNote Latest Site Hacked In Coordinated Attack

The online personal and business productivity service Evernote.com said on Saturday that it is the victim of a hack that exposed encrypted user password information, forcing password resets across a broad swath of the service’s 50 million registered users. The Redwood City, California-based firm revealed in a blog post that its internal security team discovered “suspicious activity on the Evernote network” that “appears to have been a coordinated attempt to access secure areas of the Evernote Service.” The company said it sent password reset messages to its users as a “precaution” but didn’t believe that stored information in users’ accounts or payment information had been exposed. The hack is just the latest of a prominent online firm. In recent weeks, Twitter, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft have all reported compromises of their internal networks. Those intrusions were linked to attacks aimed at developers and relied on exploits of previously unknown “zero day” […]

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Bit9: 32 Pieces of Malware Whitelisted In Targeted Hack

February 26, 2013 04:372 comments
Bit9: 32 Pieces of Malware Whitelisted In Targeted Hack

The security firm Bit9 released a more detailed analysis of the hack of its corporate network was part of a larger operation that was  aimed a firms in a “very narrow market space” and intended to gather information from the firms.   The analysis, posted on Monday on Bit9′s blog is the most detailed to date of a hack that was first reported on February 8 by the blog Krebsonsecurity.com, but that began in July, 2012.  In the analysis, by Bit9 Chief Technology Officer Harry Sverdlove said  32 separate malware files and malicious scripts were whitelisted in the hack. Bit9 declined to name the three customers affected by the breach, or the industry segment that was targeted, but denied that it was a government agency or a provider of critical infrastructure such as energy, utilities or banking. The broad outlines of the story about the hack of Bit9, which sells […]

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Browser Security Still A Sore Spot For Companies (Podcast)

February 25, 2013 09:472 comments
Browser Security Still A Sore Spot For Companies (Podcast)

Clueless “end users” are a common straw man (or woman) in the security industry. They’re blamed for everything from data breaches to malware infections. Accepted wisdom is that companies “get it” when it comes to security – consumers (their employees) don’t. But what if it is the other way around? That’s one tantalizing bit of data you could take away from Qualys’s Browser Check service. The free online vulnerability scanning service has assessed millions of endpoints in its two years of existence. And, by and large, it has found that consumers – not corporate users – are following good security practice by migrating to more modern, and secure web browsers. In  our inaugural Security Ledger Podcast, we sat down with Wolfgang Kandek, the Chief Technology Officer at Qualys Inc. to find out. Qualys operates Browser Check (browsercheck.qualys.com), a free service that allows consumers to assess the security of their browser […]

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Are Mobile App Developers Prey In A Massive Watering Hole Attack?

February 18, 2013 17:031 comment
Are Mobile App Developers Prey In A Massive Watering Hole Attack?

Say you’re a “bad guy” and what you really want to do is compromise the systems of some high value targets – like software developers working a prominent, Silicon Valley firms like Facebook and Twitter.   Breaking through the front door isn’t easy – these companies mostly have the technology chops to protect their networks and employees. Phishing e-mails are also a tough sell: the developer community is heavy on Apple Mac systems and – besides – application developers might be harder to phish than your average Fortune 500 executive. A better approach might be to let your prey come to you – attacking them passively by gaining control of a trusted third party web site – a so-called “watering hole.” That’s a scenario that has played out in a number of recent, high profile attacks, such as the so-called “VoHo” attacks documented by Symantec and RSA. It may also be […]

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Friday Night Massacre: Twitter Hacked, Info on 250k Exposed

February 2, 2013 14:101 comment
Friday Night Massacre: Twitter Hacked, Info on 250k Exposed

What better time to drop some really bad and embarrassing news than late on a Friday afternoon, as everyone is heading out the door? So it was with social media giant Twitter, which dropped a bombshell late Friday: revealing that it had been compromised in an “extremely sophisticated” attack that yielded the account credentials for around 250,000 users. A blog post by Twitter Security Team member Bob Lord on Friday said that the company has been investigating the breach all week long, after detecting unusual patterns of account access across its network. After stopping an attack that was in progress, the company’s investigation revealed that the attackers “may have had access to limited user information – usernames, email addresses, session tokens and encrypted/saltedversions of passwords – for approximately 250,000 users,” Lord wrote. Twitter did not discuss the circumstances of the breach, but reiterated guidance from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security for users to disable Java […]

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