Tag: encryption

Petya Malware is about wreaking Havoc, not collecting Ransom | The Register

Petya Malware is about wreaking Havoc, not collecting Ransom | The Register

In-brief: On Tuesday, a ransomware infection spread across Europe and even affected companies and systems as far away as the United States and Brazil. Iain Thomson at The Register breaks down the malware used in the attack, dubbed NotPetya because it disguises itself as the Petya ransomware, although in the end it seems it was designed to wreak havoc, not collect money.

UPDATED: Is this Cyber War? Ransomware Attack Hits Banks, Transport, Government in Ukraine

UPDATED: Is this Cyber War? Ransomware Attack Hits Banks, Transport, Government in Ukraine

Fast spreading ransomware dubbed Petya has crippled parts of Ukraine and hit companies in The Netherlands, France, Russia and Spain. It appears to be spreading using a combination of software exploit and stolen passwords.

Podcast: The Internet of Things’ Entropy Problem and why it matters

Podcast: The Internet of Things’ Entropy Problem and why it matters

In-brief: Governments may worry about the democratization of strong encryption. But a bigger problem may be that the encryption we think is strong really isn’t, says Richard Moulds of the firm Whitewood. In this podcast, we talk about the.growing difficulty of generating truly random numbers in cloud environments and on the Internet of Things and how ‘entropy as a service’ may be the answer.

Identity at Scale: how the Internet of Things will Revolutionize Online Identity

Identity at Scale: how the Internet of Things will Revolutionize Online Identity

In-brief: Far from ‘breaking’ the public key encryption (PKI) model, the Internet of Things is poised to turbocharge PKI adoption and revolutionize online identity, DigiCert* CTO Dan Timpson writes.

For all the hoopla, the biggest question one week after WannaCry is: 'where are all the victims'? (Image courtesy of Martin Spiske. Licensed via Creative Commons.)

The WannaCry Missing: Federal Systems, Consumers

In-brief: One week after the WannaCry ransomware knocked out hospitals in the UK and subway fare systems in Germany, the malware is as notable for who it didn’t affect for who it did. Among those spared WannaCry’s wrath: federal IT systems in the U.S. as well as consumers. But why?