Vulnerabilities

In flight entertainment systems may pose security risk the security firm IOActive warned.

Update: Researcher Calls In-Flight Entertainment Hacks a Safety Threat

In-brief: Research from the firm IOActive has discovered exploitable holes in in-flight entertainment software from the firm Panasonic Avionics that may make planes vulnerable to hacking and manipulation. Editor’s note: updated with comments from interview with Ruben Santamarta of IOActive. PFR 12/21/2016

NETGEAR has patched vulnerable software for its R7000 broadband routers (pictured) but 10 other models are vulnerable, most without official patches. (Photo courtesy of NETGEAR.)

Netgear: 11 Home Router Models affected by Flaw, 3 patched

In-brief: A week after security experts at Carnegie Mellon’s CERT advised consumers about a serious security hole in home routers from the networking equipment maker NETGEAR, that firm has expanded the list of affected router models to 11, while offering official software patches for three of those models. Thousands of affected devices can be found online.

Proofpoint said a new version of the DNSChanger malware is targeting home routers.

Home Routers Under Attack via Malvertising | Proofpoint

The security firm Proofpoint is writing about a new and “improved” version of DNSChanger, an exploit kit that attacks home routers in order to serve malicious advertisements to anyone connecting through the Internet using that router. From the Proofpoint analysis: Since the end of October, we have seen an improved version of the “DNSChanger EK” [1] used in ongoing malvertising campaigns. DNSChanger attacks internet routers via potential victims’ web browsers; the EK does not rely on browser or device vulnerabilities but rather vulnerabilities in the victims’ home or small office (SOHO) routers. Most often, DNSChanger works through the Chrome browser on Windows desktops and Android devices. However, once routers are compromised, all users connecting to the router, regardless of their operating system or browser, are vulnerable to attack and further malvertising.The router attacks appear to happen in waves that are likely associated with ongoing malvertising campaigns lasting several days. Attack […]

The New York Times expose on the hacks of the DNC is a case study in how not to respond to a cyber attack. We talk with Tim Bandos of Digital Guardian about building a cyber threat hunting capability.

Don’t Be The DNC: An Introduction to Enterprise Threat Hunting

In-brief: The New York Times expose on the hack of the Democratic National Committee is a case study in how not to respond to a cyber attack. In this video interview with Tim Bandos of Digital Guardian, we talk about how to do it right. His new ebook on hunting digital threats in the enterprise explains that incident response doesn’t have to cost a fortune. 

A vulnerability in firmware used by the NetGear R7000 and other wifi routers has prompted security experts to advise customers to stop using the devices.

Update: Vulnerability Prompts Warning: Stop Using Netgear WiFi Routers

In-brief: A serious security hole in the software that runs certain models of wifi routers made by the firm Netgear prompted warnings to customers to stop using them until a fix can be found. (Editor’s Note: updated with comment from Netgear. PFR 12/12/2016)