man in the middle attack

Spotlight Podcast: CSS on why Crypto Agility is the Key to Securing Internet of Things Identities

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 34:12 — 39.1MB) | EmbedSubscribe: Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSIn this Spotlight Edition of the Security Ledger Podcast: identity is at the root of many of the security problems facing the Internet of Things, from vulnerable and “chatty” endpoints to a lack of robust update and lifecycle management features. To figure out how we might start to build a more secure IoT ecosystem, we invited Judah Aspler, the Vice President of IoT Strategy at Certified Security Solutions, or CSS Security in to talk about how more agile PKI infrastructure is one element in scaling the Internet of Things without creating a giant security mess. 

TP-Link WR-841n

Update: Flaw in widely used Wi-Fi Standard could allow snooping

Hundreds of millions of wireless devices may be affected by a flaw in WPA-2, a widely used standard for securing wireless Internet connections.  (Updated to add commentary by Bob Rudis of Rapid 7.)

Identity at Scale: how the Internet of Things will Revolutionize Online Identity

In-brief: Far from ‘breaking’ the public key encryption (PKI) model, the Internet of Things is poised to turbocharge PKI adoption and revolutionize online identity, DigiCert CTO Dan Timpson writes.

Depiction of Federal Signal Siren

Podcast: Hack, or Phreak – What Really Happened in Dallas?

In-brief: The April 7th hijacking of more than 100 civil defense sirens in Dallas was dismissed as an “old school” hack that relied copycat radio tones to set off a cacophony that lasted for nearly two hours. But was it? Security researcher Mark Loveless (aka “Simple Nomad”) has his doubts about the official explanation. In this latest Security Ledger podcast, he talks to Editor in Chief Paul Roberts about what might have really gone down in Dallas. 

St. Jude Patches Hole that allowed Medical Device Hacks

In-brief: St. Jude Medical said on Monday that it patched a serious hole in a product used to program implantable medical devices like defibrillators. But researchers and a Wall Street investment firm say the company still has more holes to close.