Oracle

Report: Cybercriminals target difficult-to-secure ERP systems with new attacks

Cybercriminals are targeting enterprise resource planning (ERP) apps–some of the oldest and most difficult-to-secure business software systems–with new attacks in an effort to exploit vulnerabilities and gain access to valuable, sensitive enterprise data, according to a new report.

Exclusive: Mirai Attack Was Costly For Dyn, Data Suggests

In-brief: More than 14,000 Internet domains stopped using managed DNS services from Dyn, the New Hampshire based company, following an October botnet attack on the company, data from Bitsight suggests.

ERP Opens Doors To Oil Industry Hacks | Motherboard

In-brief: the energy sector is particularly vulnerable to attack via ERP and other mission critical systems, according to a report.

Oracle’s Cantankerous CSO: a Symptom or the Cause?

In-brief: Oracle CSO Mary Ann Davidson’s screed against vulnerability researchers was a shock – unless you’ve been listening to what she and her employer have been saying for the last two decades.

Google Glass POV

Beyond ‘Likes’: CrowdOptic Uses Google Glass To Map Your Focus

Sometimes a technology becomes so ubiquitous and obviously useful that we (humans) cease to think critically about its shortcomings. As an illustration of this, imagine yourself teleported back in time to the island of Manhattan in 1900. You’d find a bustling metropolis, for sure. You might look around and notice that the people dressed differently, or that the skyline was different from what we’re used to. But I bet one of the things you’d notice first was the stench emanating from the piles of horse manure and puddles of urine. As this (great) post at The Daily Kos points out, there were 200,000 horses working in New York City by 1900. Those horses were dropping 4 million pounds of manure and 40,000 gallons of urine on city streets every day. “The ubiquitous street sweepers could only pile the stuff up in vacant lots, occasionally to the height of sixty feet. To […]