Consumer

Security Pro tilts at Smart Drill, finds It doesn’t suck

Security Pro tilts at Smart Drill, finds It doesn’t suck

In-brief: Is there cause for hope? A new analysis of a connected power drill  by a researcher at DUO Security finds that it’s actually pretty secure. But challenges remain for connected device makers.

The New York Times expose on the hacks of the DNC is a case study in how not to respond to a cyber attack. We talk with Tim Bandos of Digital Guardian about building a cyber threat hunting capability.

Financial Malware, not Ransomware, drives most Cyber Crime

In-brief: data from the firm Symantec shows that financial malware targeting banks – not ransomware- is the most important and oft-used tool in the cyber criminal’s toolbox. 

the U.S. Justice Department has formed a threat analysis team to study potential national security challenges posed by self-driving cars, medical devices and other Internet-connected tools.

Podcast – Smart Vehicle Security: A Report from the Lab

In-brief: In this Security Ledger podcast, Paul speaks with Sameer Dixit of Spirent Security Labs, a leading tester of connected (“smart”) vehicles. Truly secure, connected vehicles may be years away, he says. In the meantime, security flaws and poorly implemented features are a major issue, Dixit says, with many car companies still preferring bolt on security fixes over secure design. 

The Online Trust Alliance said it was merging with The Internet Society (ISOC), bringing its consumer focused privacy and security efforts to the home of the IETF. (Image courtesy of NASA.)

Online Trust Alliance to merge with Internet Society

In-brief: The Online Trust Alliance, which has focused on issues related to privacy and security on the Internet of Things, is merging with The Internet Society, home of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the groups said in an announcement Wednesday.

A researcher demonstrated a method for hacking smart television using an attack hidden in a broadcast signal. (Image courtesy of The New York Public Library.)

Researcher Says 9 in 10 Smart TVs Vulnerable to Broadcast-based Attacks

In-brief: a security researcher demonstrated a broadcast-based attacks on smart televisions, almost three years after a similar demonstration by researchers at Columbia. More than 90 percent of smart TVs may be vulnerable – but carrying out an attack may be challenging.