DOJ

Marissa Mayer, Yahoo

Podcast Episode 131: suing Yahoo! Executives…and winning

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 33:24 — 38.2MB) | EmbedSubscribe: Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSIn this week’s episode (#131): a shareholder lawsuit targeting Yahoo! executives was settled quietly. But it could have big implications for the C-Suite at breached firms. Also: as the US pursues criminal charges against Huawei for corporate espionage, we look at one of the federal government’s most potent tools to stop the transfer of sensitive IP: the Committee on Foreign Investment in the US. The C-Suite’s Bitter Pill This week, U.S. District Court judge Lucy Koh slapped down a proposed settlement of a class action lawsuit filed against Yahoo! (now part of Verizon Media) over a 2013 hack that exposed data on billions of its users. It’s just the latest twist in the saga of the once great search giant, who fell victim to hackers and then – astoundingly – […]

DoJ Charges Huawei Execs in Broad Indictment Spanning 10 Years of Criminal Activity

The Department of Justice (DoJ) filed broad charges against Chinese telecom giant Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. and its CFO Wanzhou Meng for allegedly stealing trade secrets from U.S. mobile firm T-Mobile and deceiving U.S. stakeholders about its business activity in Iran, among a number of other fraud and conspiracy activities over a 10-year period.

Podcast: What does the Yahoo Indictment tell us about Russian state hacking?

In-brief: The Department of Justice announced charges against four men for the attack on Yahoo that netted information on 500 million users. But what do we know about the men and their alleged crime? Security Ledger Editor in Chief Paul Roberts speaks with Igor Baikalov of Securonix about the incident. 

connected vehicles

Justice Dept. studying national security threats of Internet of Things devices

Reuters is reporting that the U.S. Justice Department has formed a threat analysis team to study potential national security challenges posed by self-driving cars, medical devices and other Internet-connected tools. The new group’s goal is to secure the so-called “internet of things” from exploitation by “terrorist threats” and by others who might try to hack devices to cause loss of life or achieve political or economic gain, according to Assistant Attorney General John Carlin, head of the Justice Department’s national security division. The impetus for the team, which has been informally active for about six months, was an understanding that the internet is vulnerable to cyber attacks partly because it was not designed with security in mind, Carlin told Reuters, after announcing the group on Thursday at the Intelligence and National Security Alliance conference in Washington. Source: Justice Dept. group studying national security threats of internet-linked devices

Hacker Charged in Breach of New York Dam

In-brief: The Department of Justice on Thursday announced charges against seven Iranian men in connection with a campaign of attacks on U.S. banks, financial services firms and critical infrastructure, including a Rye, New York dam.