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The FBI is warning medical and dental offices to be on the lookout for insecure FTP servers.

Securing Medical Devices, Rethinking OWASP’s Top 10 & BlackDuck CEO Lou Shipley

In this, our 70th episode of The Security Ledger podcast, we speak withXu Zou of the Internet of Things security startup Zingbox about the challenges of securing medical devices and clinical networks from cyber attack. Also: we take a look at the turmoil that has erupted around the OWASP Top 10, a list of common application security foibles. And finally: open source management vendor Black Duck Software announced that it was being acquired for more than half a billion dollars. We sit down with Black Duck CEO Lou Shipley to talk about the software supply chain and to hear what’s next for his company.

Survey of Enterprises Finds High Anxiety over IoT

Survey of Enterprises Finds High Anxiety over IoT

A survey by Forrester and the firm Forescout finds business leaders in a state of high anxiety over the Internet of Things, as more connected devices infiltrate the workplace. 

Pharmaceutical giant Merck said on Friday that the NotPetya malware outbreak in June halted production and left it short of doses of Gardasil, a critical vaccine to prevent HPV. (Image courtesy of Merck.)

NotPetya Infection Left Merck Short of Key HPV Vaccine

The NotPetya malware infection shut down pharmaceutical giant Merck’s production of the pediatric vaccine GARDASIL last June, forcing the company to borrow the drug from a stockpile maintained by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to meet demand.

A new report by DHS and the FBI describes recent attacks by a group known as DragonFly or Energetic Bear against energy and critical infrastructure firms. (Image courtesy of CrowdStrike.)

FBI and Homeland Security dish Dirt on Critical Infrastructure Attacks

A new joint FBI-DHS report dishes the dirt on recent sophisticated attacks targeting the US energy grid and critical infrastructure, saying third party firms and web sites to gain access to energy and other critical infrastructure networks. It also names a sophisticated hacking group believed to be linked to the government of Russia. 

A sign on display at Office Depot stores informs customers that they can have Kaspersky Lab's software removed for free and replaced with competing software by McAfee.

Cold War Special: Office Depot Offers Free Kaspersky Removal over Spy Concerns

Pressure is mounting on Russian antivirus vendor Kaspersky Lab with office supplies giant Office Depot offering to remove it from customers’ computers for free and a Congressional hearing on the company’s links to Russian intelligence scheduled for later in October.