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Adobe Pushes Fix For Flash Player, Cites Attacks On Windows, Mac, Android

Adobe Pushes Fix For Flash Player, Cites Attacks On Windows, Mac, Android

Adobe released an urgent fix on Thursday for recent versions of Flash Player, citing ongoing attacks against both Windows, Apple Mac, Linux and Android systems. Adobe released the security updates to fix a vulnerability, CVE-2013-0633 in Flash Player, noting that the vulnerability is being exploited “in the wild” (that is: on the public Internet) in targeted attacks. The attacks involve both web based attacks via malicious or compromised web sites and e-mail based attacks. The web based attacks use malicious Flash (SWF-format) content and target vulnerable versions of the Flash Player for the Firefox and Safari web browsers. The e-mail attacks use a malicious Microsoft Word document delivered as an e-mail attachment. The document contains malicious Flash (SWF) content and the email tries to trick the recipient into opening it. The vulnerability in question, CVE-2013-0633 is described as a buffer overflow in Adobe Flash Player that “allows remote attackers to execute […]

Wealthy Countries Better At Protecting Citizens…From Malware

Wealthy Countries Better At Protecting Citizens…From Malware

To paraphrase a quote attributed to the great American novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald: ‘Rich countries aren’t like you and me. They have less malware.’ That’s the conclusion of a special Security Intelligence Report released by Microsoft on Wednesday, which found that the rate of malware infections was relatively lower in countries that were wealthy than those with lower gross income per capita. The study, “Linking Cybersecurity Policy and Performance” investigated the links between rates of computer infections and a range of national characteristics including the relative wealth of a nation, observance of the rule of law and the rate of software piracy. The conclusion: wealthier nations, especially in Europe, do a better job preventing malware infections than poorer and developing nations. The report marks an effort by Microsoft to dig into some of the underlying causes of cyber insecurity globally. Using data gathered from its Malicious Software Removal Tool (MSRT) […]

New Malware Takes ‘Extended Naps’ To Avoid Detection

New Malware Takes ‘Extended Naps’ To Avoid Detection

It’s a truism that even the bleakest circumstances look a bit brighter after a good nap. Well, that wisdom isn’t lost on malware authors either. A newly discovered Trojan Horse program, dubbed Trojan Nap, is programmed to use extended sleep cycles to fool behavior based anti-malware tools, according to a report from the firm FireEye. In a blog post Tuesday, researchers Abhishek Singh and Ali Islam said the new malware has a function, dubbed SleepEx() that can be used to configure long “naps” that the malware takes after it is installed on a compromised system. The default value, 600,000 milliseconds – or 10 minutes – seems designed to fool automated analysis systems that are programmed to capture a sample of behavior for a set time frame. “By executing a sleep call with a long timeout, Nap can prevent an automated analysis system from capturing its malicious behavior,” FireEye said. Like other […]

You’ve Been Hacked By APT! (The Video)

You’ve Been Hacked By APT! (The Video)

The whole APT – or “Advanced Persistent Threat” – meme has received a lot of attention in the media. This site and others have written about APT-style hacks, such as the recent compromise at The New York Times. But what does an APT hack look like? And what would it mean if you or your employer were in the crosshairs of an APT-type actor? The SANS Institute’s Securing The Human project has put together a nice training video that helps answer some of these questions, and to explain how APT-style attacks work. This is good stuff – explaining the difference between cyber crime and APT, and generic enough that any organization could use it as a training video. SANS says that it will produce one of these a month, and post them on the first of each month. My only criticism here is that, after they do a solid job describing […]

Researchers: Hole In TLS Encryption Could Expose Secure Web Sessions

Researchers: Hole In TLS Encryption Could Expose Secure Web Sessions

Researchers at the University of London are going public with a paper that claims to have found a flaw in the specification for Transport Layer Security (TLS) that could leave supposedly secure Web, IM, VoIP and other online sessions exposed to prying eyes. The researchers, Nadhem Al Fardan and Kenny Patterson of the Information Security Group at Royal Holloway, University of London said that the security hole stem from a flaw in the TLS specification, rather than a bug in how TLS is implemented. The two researchers have developed proof of concept attacks that take advantage of the flaw, and that could be used to recover a complete block of TLS-encrypted plaintext, the researchers said. Al Fardan is a Ph.D student in the Information Security Group. Patterson is a professor of Information Security there. The two have  discovered other, serious holes in TLS before. Notably: the two discovered a critical […]