Search Results for "Heartbleed"

Podcast: Is Defense-In-Depth The Only Real Heartbleed Fix?

Podcast: Play in new window | Download () | EmbedSubscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | Email | TuneIn | RSS | https://www.securityledger.com/subscribeLike everyone else, we wrote extensively in the last month about the serious security vulnerability in OpenSSL dubbed “Heartbleed,” which affected many of the world’s leading web sites and services, including Facebook and Google. The large-type headlines about Heartbleed have passed. But that doesn’t mean that the danger has. As we have noted,  we are entering a phase that might be considered Heartbleed’s ‘long tail.’ Most of the well-trafficked websites that were vulnerable to Heartbleed have gotten around to fixing the vulnerability. But public-facing web servers are only the beginning of the story for OpenSSL. Chasing down the vulnerability’s long tail in third-party applications and on internal web sites and applications is a much larger task. As I’ve noted: open source components make their way into all manner of applications […]

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Tripping Over Heartbleed’s Long Tail

The news about the dreadful Heartbleed OpenSSL vulnerability keeps pumping – almost a month since it first made headlines. But now that other, equally scary security news is stealing the headlines (like the nasty Internet Explorer vulnerability that was announced this week, Heartbleed is taking a back seat. So where do things stand? I think its safe to say that we’re entering a phase that might be considered Heartbleed’s ‘long tail.’ On the one hand: there’s evidence of good news. The Register reported today that data collected by the firm Qualys suggests that almost all websites that were vulnerable to Heartbleed three weeks ago are now patched and no longer vulnerable. The Register’s John Leyden quotes Ristic, the director of engineering at Qualys, putting the percent of web sites, globally, that are still vulnerable to Heartbleed at 1 percent. That’s great news – but I don’t think its the end of the story […]

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Heartbleed Prompts Fiscal Lifeline For Open Source

One of the most powerful (and substantive) realizations to come out of the news about the ‘Heartbleed’ OpenSSL vulnerability was that open source projects need help and attention from the tech community that relies on their fruits. I’ve written about this before – noting Apple’s reluctance to put some of its considerable cash hoard towards supporting open source projects it relies on (like the Apache Software Foundation), as have others. [Read Security Ledger’s coverage of the Heartbleed vulnerability here.]   Now that idea appears to have taken root. On Thursday, the Linux Foundation announced the creation of the Core Infrastructure Initiative, a multi-million dollar project to fund open source projects that are in the critical path for core computing functions. The CII group has some substantial backing. Google, Cisco, Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon, IBM, Intel, Samsung, Fujitsu and VMWare all signed on to the CII Steering Committee. (Surprising (or not): Apple was not one of the firms supporting […]

Google-DataCenter

Heartbleed: Technology Monoculture’s Second Act

Say ‘technology monoculture’ and most people (who don’t look at you cross-eyed or say ‘God bless you!’) will say “Microsoft” or “Windows” or “Microsoft Windows.” That makes sense. Windows still runs on more than 90% of all desktop systems, long after Redmond’s star is rumored to have dimmed next to that of Apple. Microsoft is the poster child for the dangers and benefits of a monoculture. Hardware makers and application developers have a single platform to write to – consumers have confidence that the software and hardware they buy will “just work” so long as they’re running some version of Windows. The downside, of course, is that the Windows monoculture has also been a boon to bad guys, who can tailor exploits to one operating system or associated application (Office, Internet Explorer) and be confident that 9 of 10 systems their malicious software encounters will at least be running some version of the […]

History Suggests Heartbleed Will Continue To Beat

The SANS Internet Storm Center dialed down the panic on Monday, resetting the Infocon to “Green” and citing the increased awareness of the critical OpenSSL vulnerability known as Heartbleed as the reason.   Still, the drumbeat of news about a serious vulnerability in the OpenSSL encryption software continued this week. Among the large-font headlines: tens of  millions of Android mobile devices running version 4.1 of that mobile operating system (or “Jelly Bean”) use a vulnerable version of the OpenSSL software. Also: more infrastructure and web application players announced patches to address the Heartbleed vulnerability. They include virtualization software vendor VMWare, as well as cloud-based file sharing service Box. If history is any guide: at some point in the next week or two, the drumbeat will soften and, eventually, go silent or nearly so. But that hardly means the Heartbleed problem has gone away. In fact, if Heartbleed follows the same […]