bounty

Podcast Episode 118: White Hat Eye on the Gaming Guy

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 51:57 — 59.4MB)Subscribe: Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSIn this week’s episode, #118: modern computer games are like mini economies and that makes them a big target for hackers. We talk with four leading researchers from Bug Crowd about how even popular games fall down on security. Also: Srinivas Mukkamala, the CEO of RiskSense about how artificial intelligence and risk based approaches to securing elections systems could pay off.

Podcast Episode 112: what it takes to be a top bug hunter

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 39:54 — 45.7MB)Subscribe: Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSS In this week’s episode (#112): top bug hunters can earn more than $1 million a year from “bounties” paid for information on exploitable software holes in common platforms and applications. What does it take to be among the best? We talk with Jason Haddix of the firm Bug Crowd to find out. Also: The Internet Society’s Jeff Wilbur talks about the new #GetIoTSmart campaign to educate device makers and the public about Internet of Things security. 

Hacked Nukes

Episode 79: Hackable Nukes and Dissecting Naughty Toys

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 35:43 — 40.9MB)Subscribe: Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSIn this week’s Security Ledger Podcast episode, the UK -based policy think tank Chatham House warned last week that aging nuclear weapons systems in the U.S., the U.K. and other nations are vulnerable to cyber attacks that could be used to start a global conflagration. We talk with Eddie Habbibi of PAS Global about what can be done to secure hackable nukes. Also: with CES raging in Las Vegas last week, we go deep with security researcher Jay Harris on flaws in connected toys being sold to children.

Florida Man

Podcast: will Uber’s Florida Man Problem chill Bug Bounties?

Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 1:06:17 — 75.9MB)Subscribe: Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSIn our latest podcast: the ride sharing firm Uber finds itself on the wrong side of a Florida Man story after paying $100,000 in hush money to a man from The Sunshine State who stole information on 57 million Uber customers. We speak with Katie Moussouris about how the company’s actions could affect the future of the young vulnerability disclosure industry. Also: with BitCoins trading for $16,000 each, Wandera researcher Dan Cuddeford joins us to talk about mobile crypto-jacking schemes that hijack mobile devices to mine crypto currencies. And we invite Alan Brill of the firm Kroll back to discuss recent House of Representatives hearings on the future of authentication in an age of rampant data sharing and data theft.

Department of Defense Sets Ground Rules for Hackers

In-brief: The U.S. Department of Defense published guidelines on Monday for independent security researchers to disclose vulnerabilities in DoD’s public facing systems. The program, managed by the firm HackerOne, provides a legal route for hackers to disclose vulnerabilities to the military.