Opinion

Heartbleed’s Heartburn: Why a 5 Year Old Vulnerability Continues to Bite

Heartbleed’s Heartburn: Why a 5 Year Old Vulnerability Continues to Bite

In-brief: more than three years after it was first discovered, the Heartbleed vulnerability in OpenSSL continues to plague organizations worldwide. Why has it been so hard to fix? In this Industry Perspective, Patrick Carey of the firm Black Duck talks about some of the complicating factors that make vulnerabilities like Heartbleed so hard to eradicate. 

Identity at Scale: how the Internet of Things will Revolutionize Online Identity

Identity at Scale: how the Internet of Things will Revolutionize Online Identity

In-brief: Far from ‘breaking’ the public key encryption (PKI) model, the Internet of Things is poised to turbocharge PKI adoption and revolutionize online identity, DigiCert* CTO Dan Timpson writes.

The U.S. Government is dangerously dependent on old and outdated hardware and software, some dating to the 1960s.

Our Analog Future: Experts Call for Preserving Copper, Pneumatic Systems as Hedge for Cyber Risk

In-brief: The U.S. should invest in equipment and talent to preserve legacy, analog infrastructure such as copper wire telecommunications networks and pneumatic pumps as a hedge against massively disruptive cyber attacks and other interruptions, two researchers with The MITRE Corporation argue in a recent opinion piece. 

Tallinn, Estonia's Capital City

Estonia 10 Years Later: Lessons learned from the World’s First Internet War

In-brief: Gadi Evron recalls the denial of service attacks aimed at the government of Estonia in 2007 – one of the first recognized acts of ‘cyber war’ and a template for incidents that followed. Evron says there were many lessons in that incident – some of which the U.S. and its allies are still struggling to learn. 

A visual representation of the sites supporting "counter narratives" and other conspiracy theories online. (Image courtesy of University of Washington.)

Podcast: Facebook Makes a Stand. But can Fake News be stopped?

In-brief: Facebook on Thursday unveiled a new initiative to stamp out disinformation and ‘fake news,’ but University of Washington researcher Kate Starbird, who is studying online ‘counter narratives’ says that conspiracy theories and ‘truthers’ may be here to stay.