Podcasts

Faced with blowback from its cyber operations in the US and Western Europe, will Russia reconsider the utility of such tools? Flashpoint said that is one possible development to watch for in 2018. (Image courtesy of the U.S. Department of Defense.)

Spotlight Podcast: Is Russia rethinking its Cyber Offense?

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSSIf 2016 and 2017 saw aggressive efforts by the government of Russia to use hacking and online information operations to influence politics in the U.S. and Western Europe, 2018 may see the country reckoning with the aftermath of those campaigns. And that may result in a rethink of the utility of online information and hacking operations, says Flashpoint in its Business Risk Intelligence report. 

We talk with PAS Global about a Chatham House report on the hacking risk to nuclear weapons.

Episode 79: Hackable Nukes and Dissecting Naughty Toys

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSSIn this week’s Security Ledger Podcast episode, the UK -based policy think tank Chatham House warned last week that aging nuclear weapons systems in the U.S., the U.K. and other nations are vulnerable to cyber attacks that could be used to start a global conflagration. We talk with Eddie Habbibi of PAS Global about what can be done to secure hackable nukes. Also: with CES raging in Las Vegas last week, we go deep with security researcher Jay Harris on flaws in connected toys being sold to children.

Will a data war erupt between the EU and US over security and privacy protections? That's one prediction that Paul Rosenzweig of Lawfare blog makes for 2018.

Episode 78: Meltdown and Spectre with Joe Unsworth of Gartner and will GDPR spark a Data War in 2018?

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSSIn this week’s Security Ledger podcast, Joe Unsworth has been covering the semiconductor space for Gartner for 15 years, but he’s never seen anything like Meltdown and Spectre, the two vulnerabilities that Google researchers identified in a wide range of microprocessors. In this podcast, Joe comes in to talk with us about what the flaws will mean for major chip vendors. Also: we kick off 2018 with a pair of predictions for the New Year from two of the smartest guys in the information security business. Lawyer and Lawfare blogger Paul Rosenzweig speaks with us about the year ahead including the possibility of a data war between the US and the EU. Also: Experian VP for Consumer Protection Mike Bruemmer comes in to talk to us about that company’s Data Breach Industry Forecast for 2018.

An interview with one of the technical advisors to the hit show Mr. Robot was among the most popular podcast segments in 2017.

Episode 77: From Russian Hacking to Mr. Robot Our Most Popular Podcasts of 2017

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSSIn this, our final episode of 2017, we look back at our most popular segments from the past year – many of which touched on issues that (surprise, surprise) crossed the boundary between information security and politics. Among the most popular segments were discussions of hacking the U.S. election systems, a primer on the cyber capabilities of North Korea with Crowd Strike, a conversation of the case against the Russian firm Kaspersky Lab and an interview with the guy who helps make the hacking scenes in the USA Network’s Mr. Robot look so real.

Podcast Episode 76: Inside the Alteryx Breach with Chris Vickery

Podcast Episode 76: Inside the Alteryx Breach with Chris Vickery

Podcast: Play in new window | DownloadSubscribe: Android | RSSIn this week’s edition of The Security Ledger Podcast we talk with security researcher and data spelunker Chris Vickery of the firm UpGuard about his discovery of  a data trove containing consumer profiles on 123 million American households. Also: there’s a tough new standard for handling federal data come January 1st in the form of NIST’s 800-171 standard. And: Katie Moussouris joins us back in the studio to talk about what the updated Wassenaar Arrangement means for security researchers.