biomedical devices

Visitors to the Consumer Electronics Show

NIST Floats Internet of Things Cybersecurity Standards

There are plenty of standards that can be used to help secure The Internet of Things, but not much evidence that they’re being used, according to NIST, which calls on government and industry to settle on conforming standards for IoT products in a new report. 

Revolar personal safety device

Episode 81: Hacking IoT with Physics, Poor Grades for Safety Wearables and Peak Ransomware

In this week’s podcast: researcher Kevin Fu of University of Michigan discusses his work on attacks that use physics to manipulate connected devices. Also: Mark Loveless of DUO discusses his research into how poor implementation of wireless protocols make personal security trackers a privacy risk. And have we seen peak ransomware? Adam Kujawa of the firm Malwarebytes joins us to talk about the findings of that company’s State of Malware Report. 

operating room

Securing Medical Devices, Rethinking OWASP’s Top 10 & BlackDuck CEO Lou Shipley

In this, our 70th episode of The Security Ledger podcast, we speak withXu Zou of the Internet of Things security startup Zingbox about the challenges of securing medical devices and clinical networks from cyber attack. Also: we take a look at the turmoil that has erupted around the OWASP Top 10, a list of common application security foibles. And finally: open source management vendor Black Duck Software announced that it was being acquired for more than half a billion dollars. We sit down with Black Duck CEO Lou Shipley to talk about the software supply chain and to hear what’s next for his company.

Connected Office

Survey finds Device Makers Security Priorities Often Misplaced

Low-hanging Internet of Things security fruit may be left unpicked, as connected device makers fret about the predation of sophisticated hackers, but balk at simple security fixes, a Security Ledger and LogMeIn survey finds. You can download the full report here in PDF format.

A Year Later: FDA approves Software Fix for Security Flaws in Pacemakers

In-brief: The FDA as approved a software update to software security holes in pacemakers made by Abbott. But doctors and patients will have to weigh the risks of apply the patch.