Medicine

Printable Smart Labels Warn When The Milk’s Gone Bad

Printable Smart Labels Warn When The Milk’s Gone Bad

What’s been called “The Internet of Things” or “The Internet of Everything” is a revolution in computing that has seen the population of Internet connected “stuff” skyrocket. By 2020, there will be an estimated 50 billion devices connected to the Internet (or whatever its called then). Today, the list of IP-enabled stuff is already long: phones, automobiles, household appliances, clothing. But, under the hood, a lot of these devices really aren’t much different from the PCs that grace our desks. They have hard drives, CPUs, memory, input devices, and so on. Most are still assembled in factories by humans and machines. This can be done cheaply and, in some cases, automated. But it’s still a labor-intensive and expensive process. But what if you could just “print” working electronics like, say, The New York Times prints its daily newspaper (at least for now!)?   That would change everything. For one thing: […]

Two recent articles highlight concerns about the impact of IP enabled stuff on traditional network security.

News Roundup: Plundering The Internet Of Things

There were two interesting pieces on the fast-evolving topic of security and the Internet of Things that are worth reading. The first is a long piece by Bob Violino over at CSO that takes the pulse of the IoT and security question right now. The big picture: its early days, but that there are some troubling trends.   The vast expansion of IP-enabled devices is matched by a lack of security know-how at device makers, Violino writes. And, as the environment of “smart devices” grows, the interactions between those devices become more difficult to anticipate – especially as devices start sharing contextual data and taking actions based on that data. “As machines become autonomous they are able to interact with other machines and make decisions which impact upon the physical world,” notes Andrew Rose, a principal analyst at Forrester Research Inc. in Cambridge, Mass. Rose says. “But these are coded by […]

Welcoming A New Sponsor: Gemalto

Welcoming A New Sponsor: Gemalto

Just a note to my loyal readers that The Security Ledger is welcoming a new sponsor this week: Gemalto. If you’re not familiar with them, Gemalto NV (GTO) is a ~3B firm that makes a wide range of software for e-identity documents, chip payment cards, network authentication devices and wireless modules, as well as the software to manage confidential data and secure transactions in the telecommunications, financial services, e-government, and information technology security markets. This is an especially exciting win for The Security Ledger because Gemalto, with 10,000 employees and offices in 46 countries is a key supplier to the global Internet of Things. Products like its Protiva platform provide the foundation of trust that undergirds online person-to-machine and machine-to-machine transactions and exchanges of all kinds: on mobile devices, smart cards, medical devices, automobiles and more. We’re really excited to have Gemalto on board as a Security Ledger sponsor. Please join […]

Update: Researchers Use Weezer Tune To Knock Defibrillators Offline

Update: Researchers Use Weezer Tune To Knock Defibrillators Offline

Editor’s Note: This article has been updated to include comment from Medtronic and from the researchers. A bit more on that: I spoke to the fine researchers who conducted this study. They are concerned that people might casually read the headline or first couple paragraphs and conclude that listening to Weezer will kill them. Listening to Weezer will not kill you. Listening to Weezer will not interfere with your implanted defibrillator if used under normal conditions. Their experiment (and my article) make this clear, but you do have to  read down a bit in the article to get that, and I know not everyone does that. In any case, the health benefits of using an implanted defibrillator in accordance with your doctor’s instructions, far outweigh any risk from EMI or other electronic tampering. – PFR 5/22/2013. Listening to Weezer could kill you. Literally. That’s the conclusion of an unusual experiment […]