Medicine

Update: UK Hospitals among Victims of Massive Ransomware Attack

In-brief: Hospitals across England were forced to divert patients from emergency departments after suffering what has been described as a cyber attack involving ransomware, according to published reports and a statement from the UK’s National Health Service. (Editor’s Note: Updated to include information on the Wana ransomware. PFR May 12, 2017)

FBI Warns Medical Offices: Exposed FTP Servers are a Target

In-brief: The FBI is telling medical and dental offices to lock down anyFile Transfer Protocol (FTP) servers in their environments, warning that cyber criminals are searching for exposed FTP servers as a pathway to sensitive networks and protected health information (PHI). 

Silent Epidemic: Data Theft has become a Public Health Crisis | Digital Guardian

In-brief: One in four Americans was the victim of data theft, but policy makers can’t find the spirit to act. What if I said that there was a disease that affected one in four adults in the U.S.? This disease caused pain and hardship and the costs of curing it were considerable – ranging to thousands of dollars per patient? And, again: one in four people contacted this disease – 25% of the adult population?Most epidemiologists would consider a disease that widely spread to be an “epidemic.” After all, the CDC considers an influenza outbreak to be an “epidemic” when around 7% of morbidity (deaths) in a given observation period are due to the flu. Here in the U.S., however, there’s a long-standing affliction bearing down on a quarter of the population, but nary a mention of the words “epidemic.” In fact, officials who monitor this disease are loath to […]

New Website Is Clearing House for Medical Device Vulnerabilities

In-brief: A website run by the National Health ISAC will serve as a clearing house for information on security vulnerabilities in medical devices, the first of its kind in the US.

Short Sheet: Researchers Raise Doubts on St. Jude Device Hack

In-brief: The battle of words over the security of devices by St. Jude Medical continued on Tuesday, as researchers from University of Michigan raised questions about claims that security researchers had actually “crashed” implantable pace makers.