Agriculture

Hobbled by DMCA, Farmers are jail breaking Tractors | Motherboard

In-brief: Hobbled by draconian copyright restrictions from manufacturers like John Deere that make it impossible to modify or repair equipment, farmers in the U.S. have turned to unofficial software produced in countries like Ukraine to maintain their equipment. 

Fixing farm equipment

Right to Repair on the Ropes in Minnesota | Motherboard

In-brief: Proposed legislation to prevent manufacturers from denying owners and independent repair people to fix and maintain software-based products is being sidelined by opposition from private firms like equipment maker John Deere, Motherboard reports.

DMCA Exemptions will Boost IoT Security Research

In-brief: After a year in limbo, the Librarian of Congress moved last week to allow a number of exceptions to the U.S. Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) that will clear the way for researchers to explore smart vehicles and other products. 

European Commission Ponders Security Labels for IoT | EurActiv.com

The web site EurActiv.com is reporting that the European Commission (EC) is getting ready to propose new legislation to protect machines from cybersecurity breaches. Among the steps they’re considering: labels for Internet-connected devices that tell consumers they are “approved and secure.” Products across industries from energy and consumer goods to automotive and healthcare could eventually be required to use the labels on their products, just as electrical devices currently contain labels that inform consumers how much power they use, EU officials said. Digital policy chiefs Günther Oettinger and Andrus Ansip presented a plan three weeks ago to speed up internet connections to meet the needs of big industries like car manufacturing and agriculture as they gradually use more internet functions. But lawmakers recognize that the transition to more and faster internet connections has caused many companies to worry that new products and industrial tools that rely on the internet will be more vulnerable […]

Start-Up Claroty Has Eye On Industrial Control System Threats

In-brief: Claroty, an Israel-based start-up emerged from stealth mode on Tuesday, unveiling a new platform that it claims will help owners of industrial control systems detect threats and attacks by sophisticated adversaries.